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Please note that not all are open to the public, so please check the listing, and if neccessary call the farm before visiting. You may also want to take your own containers to save plastic and some cash, rather than credit cards.

Instructions: Drag the map and click on the signs to find more details about the individual Cider producer of outlet.

View Larger Map View in Google Earth

Map used with permission of Old Time Dave

Here is a list of Cider and Perry Producers in North America.

If you have any new producers or want to be added as a producer yourself, just email us your details.

You will find the web sites, location and twitter profile, eg: @realcider (if there is one) for each producer.

USA

West Coast

Mid West

East Coast

Great Lakes

New England

Canada

East Coast

West Coast

It’s that time of year again, when cider makers and people wanting their apples to go to good homes contact us to get in touch with us.

If you are donating apples, or in need of more apples please leave your details on the document below.

Add your details here – The Apple Sharing Exchange

Do you have an apple tree but can’t use all your apples? Due to recent demand of people wanting to learn how to make their own cider, we are going to help make this even easier for you.

Please consider sharing your surplus apples and pears with other members of the Real Cider community.

We hope you think this is ethically, socially and environmentally friendly way of managing the free resource of fresh apples we have each year!

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Do you have an apple tree but can’t use all your apples?

Please consider sharing your surplus apples and pears with other members of the Real Cider community.

Due to recent demand of people wanting to learn how to make their own cider, we are going to help make this even easier for you.

Why?

Well. there are plenty of people and places around the country that have surplus apples, and windfalls from neighbours that are never used, and are left to go to waste.

This is for everyone to use, whether you live in England, Wales, America and beyond!

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We always like receiving updates from fruit growers and cider makers on their crops especially as Somerset was under water for months this year.

No one really knows the full damage that has been caused by the orchards standing in floods. Fruit trees certainly are not suited to wetland habitats. Flooding – or even prolonged water-logging – will kill the fibrous roots (which are incidentally designed to collect water) of fruit trees in a couple of weeks.

The Telegraph reports

The wettest winter on record has left almost 17,500 acres of orchards under threat, and an attempt to restore one of the UK’s native crops could come to nothing as many of the million trees planted over the past decade may be lost

This is the 2014 crop report from Orchard Groundcare:

The season is definitely early, probably the earliest Spring since 2001. The blossom is looking very good on the whole and so far we have had very few insect problems. We are putting out our moth traps and the trees look clean and well.

Frost is forecast for the end of this week and we are crossing our fingers it is not too hard. The pears will be all right because they are past petal fall, and most of the cider varieties are not quite there yet, but the dessert varieties are in danger if the frost is hard.

Falstaff is fine down to about -3 but the Jonagolds may suffer. (In America they hover helicopters over the vineyards to move the air but I don’t think we can quite do that!)

With our new tree plantings we are very excited about the compost we have planted them into. It was put down towards the end of last year and the first thing we noticed when planting was how much easier it has been to dig the holes for the new trees. And the worm activity is astonishing.

The big unknown is about tree recovery after the very wet weather, and that will still be a question mark for a few months to come.

To receive the regular newsletter this report was extracted from – email them here. Their site is a good resource for training events, funding and tips from an active orchard network in the heart of traditional Cider country.

Once eschewed as a mild or ‘girly’ drink of choice, hard cider in recent years has seen a sudden resurgence in popularity rival to when it was once enjoyed in the U.S.

For people who are suddenly becoming aware of the tasty delights of a good alcoholic cider, you might be surprised to learn that in the days of America’s founding fathers, cider was enjoyed excessively, with even children regularly partaking in a (slightly less alcoholic) version of the stuff.

So whether you’ve been a cider aficionado for years or you’re just getting into this world of apple-flavored delight, take a look at the following infographic and see for yourself the proud history of hard cider.

View the full infographic here